Religious Education

Head of Department

Mr Lee

Subject Overview

Religious Education is relevant to all students, regardless of their own backgrounds and helps students to apply the meaning and significance of religious ideas to their own lives. It both values and challenges students own ideas, and allows for the open ended exploration of ideas.

Students develop skills such as empathy, listening to others, tolerance and respect for differing views; all needed as skills for living in a plural society. Religious Education’s impact therefore reaches far beyond the confines of the classroom.

Religious Education is intended to engage students in a systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religions and worldviews address, so that they can develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.

There is a mixture of “learning about” and “learning from” religion.

This aim is implemented through the study of “big questions” on a wide variety of themes through Key Stage 3 and specified as part of the GCSE course which allows students to look at a variety of religious and worldviews on that “big question”.  Lessons featuring case studies and world events then give students space to reflect on their own view and that of others in their class.

Key Stage 3

Key Stage 3 Overview:

Students follow the Kent Agreed Sylabus, studying the ‘Big Questions’ of  life.

Year 7:

Big Questions for Year 7;
  1. Should religious buildings be sold off and the money used to feed the hungry/
  2. What is so radical about Jesus?
  3. How is life different for a religious teenager?
 

Year 8:

Big Questions for Year 8;
  1. Does living biblically mean obeying the whole Bible?
  2. Is death the end? Does it matter?
  3. Does religion help people to be good?
 

Year 9:

Big Questions for Year 9;
  1. Do we need to prove God’s existence?
  2. How can people express the spiritual through music and art?
  3. Is religion a power for peace or a cause of conflict in the world today?
 

Assessment at Key Stage 3:

Assessment is carried out in a variety of forms including written and spoken classwork, tests, homework and end of unit and end of year summative assessment tasks and reported in line with the Academy assessment policy.
Key Stage 4

Key Stage 4 Overview:

Key Stage 4 students have the option to choose Religious Studies GCSE as a qualification to follow in Years 10 and 11. The Academy use the WJEC Eduqas examination board for this.

Years 10 and 11:

Year 10

Students carry out a systematic study of the beliefs, teachings and practices of Christianity. They also study issues of relationships and life and death as part of their philosophical and ethical studies in the modern world.

Year 11

Students carry out a systematic study of the beliefs, teachings and practices of Islam. They also study issues of human rights, good and evil as part of their philosophical and ethical studies in the modern world.  

Assessment at Key Stage 4:

Assessment is carried out in a variety of forms including written and spoken classwork, tests, homework and end of unit and end of year summative assessment tasks and reported in line with the Academy assessment policy. At the end of Year 11 students sit their final external examinations consisting of three papers lasting four hours in total.
Key Stage 5

Course Title:  

A Level Sociology

Examining Body:

AQA

Overview of the course:

Education and methods in context: Students consider the role of education in society. They look into gender and ethnicity differences in school achievement.  They also learn how to apply their own sociological research to the study of education. Research methods: Students learn how to conduct their own research from interviews to reviewing documents and official statistics. Families and households: Students consider changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, the changing status of children in the family and society as well as sociological explanations of the family and their relationship to social structures. Crime and deviance with theory and methods: Students learn about criminal and deviant behaviour, including factors that might lead a person to follow this path in life and how the   media portrays them. Theory and methods: Students expand on their knowledge of  research methods and examine the relationship between Sociology and social policy. The Mass Media Students examine issues around ownership and control, globalisation, news and current affairs, audiences, the representation of certain groups as a stereotype and new developments in the Mass Media. The relationships between social groups, culture and the Mass Media are discussed and the relevance of new technology in the contemporary world is examined.  

Assessment

Assessment is carried out in a variety of forms including written and spoken classwork, tests, homework and end of unit and end of year summative assessment tasks and reported in line with the Academy assessment policy. Final examination takes place at the end of Year 13 and there are three exams. Each accounts for one third of the student’s final A-level grade. Each of the exams last 2 hours and are worth 80 marks each.  They consist of a mixture of short answer and extended writing questions.    

Possible Career Paths:

Studying Sociology can give students a whole host of exciting career options including: Social work, human resources, advertising, policing, marketing, journalism, law and teaching.